Bathroom tile inspiration

As one of the most versatile wall and floor materials available, tiles give you almost limitless choices. With multiple options for size, shape, colour, style, finish, design and effects there’s at least one tile to suit any style – no matter how unique.

But your power to personalise your space doesn’t end there! Tiles can be laid in a range of patterns to bring out different styles, transform a room or highlight some of the special characteristics of the tiles and your space.

From the most popular and classic tile patterns to some that are more unique, we have compiled a list you should know before starting your tiling project.

Classics tile layouts

These are timeless laying patterns for floor and wall tiles. Any classic layout will look smart in any space, modern or traditional.

Stacked

This layout is a basic pattern where square tiles are set in a straight line to create a look that’s simple and clean. Rectangular tiles look very modern in this arrangement but for a more traditional look, use square tiles in a grid pattern.

Diagonal

This layout uses tiles laid at a 45-degree angle. A great way to make your floors appear wider so it’s perfect for floors in tighter spaces like small bathrooms because it highlights the longer lines that run diagonally across the room.

Offset/staggered brick pattern

Tiles in an offset pattern are laid out in rows, with each row offset half a tile length from the row either side of it. The traditional way of laying subway tiles, the offset pattern creates a staggered look that is still cohesive and pleasing, without the regimented order of a strict stacked pattern. Offset pattern tiles can also create an industrial vibe in your space. This pattern flatters handmade-look tiles while adding authenticity.

Stacked vertical

In this pattern, tiles are stacked vertically, emphasizing the height of your space by making your walls seem taller. Subway tiles suddenly take on new life and geometric appeal in this layout.

Herringbone tile layouts

Classic herringbone

One of the most striking and effective tile patterns for any wall or floor, big or small is herringbone. Perfect for when you want to draw the eye through space, this direction pattern is achieved by laying rectangular tiles in a zig-zag pattern. Popular on backsplashes, subway tiles attain new heights of style in a herringbone layout. By choosing a contrasting grout colour you can highlight the unique design.

Step ladder

A close cousin to herringbone tile patterns – thanks to its suggestions of direction and movement, the step ladder pattern involves alternating horizontally and vertically laid rectangular tiles. When the eye notices just the tiles in one direction, the effect is of a series of tiles stepping up and up diagonally across the surface.

Tile Layouts with Shapes

You can also create incredible tile patterns just be being a little bolder with shape. Shapes are trending, but two of our favourites that have definitely stood the test of time are:

Chevron

Chevron is another close relative of herringbone, but with a small change that makes a big difference to the overall effect. Instead of using purely rectangular tiles, the ends of each tile in this pattern meet the sides at a 45 degree or 30 degree angle. This parallelogram shape creates a more angular and unique layout. Unless your tile is specifically designed for this layout, it will have to be cut to fit.

Hexagon

Chevron is another close relative of herringbone, but with a small change that makes a big difference to the overall effect. Instead of using purely rectangular tiles, the ends of each tile in this pattern meet the sides at a 45 degree or 30 degree angle. This parallelogram shape creates a more angular and unique layout. Unless your tile is specifically designed for this layout, it will have to be cut to fit.

Be sure to share your layout ideas with you tiler. Depending on the pattern and tiles you choose we can help you plan out the quantities you need, the cuts and anything else you need for a job you’ll love for many years to come.

As one of the most versatile wall and floor materials available, tiles give you almost limitless choices. With multiple options for size, shape, colour, style, finish, design and effects there’s at least one tile to suit any style – no matter how unique.

But your power to personalise your space doesn’t end there! Tiles can be laid in a range of patterns to bring out different styles, transform a room or highlight some of the special characteristics of the tiles and your space.

From the most popular and classic tile patterns to some that are more unique, we have compiled a list you should know before starting your tiling project.

Classics tile layouts

These are timeless laying patterns for floor and wall tiles. Any classic layout will look smart in any space, modern or traditional.

Stacked

This layout is a basic pattern where square tiles are set in a straight line to create a look that’s simple and clean. Rectangular tiles look very modern in this arrangement but for a more traditional look, use square tiles in a grid pattern.

Diagonal

This layout uses tiles laid at a 45-degree angle. A great way to make your floors appear wider so it’s perfect for floors in tighter spaces like small bathrooms because it highlights the longer lines that run diagonally across the room.

Offset/staggered brick pattern

Tiles in an offset pattern are laid out in rows, with each row offset half a tile length from the row either side of it. The traditional way of laying subway tiles, the offset pattern creates a staggered look that is still cohesive and pleasing, without the regimented order of a strict stacked pattern. Offset pattern tiles can also create an industrial vibe in your space. This pattern flatters handmade-look tiles while adding authenticity.

Stacked vertical

In this pattern, tiles are stacked vertically, emphasizing the height of your space by making your walls seem taller. Subway tiles suddenly take on new life and geometric appeal in this layout.

Herringbone tile layouts

Classic herringbone

One of the most striking and effective tile patterns for any wall or floor, big or small is herringbone. Perfect for when you want to draw the eye through space, this direction pattern is achieved by laying rectangular tiles in a zig-zag pattern. Popular on backsplashes, subway tiles attain new heights of style in a herringbone layout. By choosing a contrasting grout colour you can highlight the unique design.

Step ladder

A close cousin to herringbone tile patterns – thanks to its suggestions of direction and movement, the step ladder pattern involves alternating horizontally and vertically laid rectangular tiles. When the eye notices just the tiles in one direction, the effect is of a series of tiles stepping up and up diagonally across the surface.

Tile Layouts with Shapes

You can also create incredible tile patterns just be being a little bolder with shape. Shapes are trending, but two of our favourites that have definitely stood the test of time are:

Chevron

Chevron is another close relative of herringbone, but with a small change that makes a big difference to the overall effect. Instead of using purely rectangular tiles, the ends of each tile in this pattern meet the sides at a 45 degree or 30 degree angle. This parallelogram shape creates a more angular and unique layout. Unless your tile is specifically designed for this layout, it will have to be cut to fit.

Hexagon

Chevron is another close relative of herringbone, but with a small change that makes a big difference to the overall effect. Instead of using purely rectangular tiles, the ends of each tile in this pattern meet the sides at a 45 degree or 30 degree angle. This parallelogram shape creates a more angular and unique layout. Unless your tile is specifically designed for this layout, it will have to be cut to fit.

Be sure to share your layout ideas with you tiler. Depending on the pattern and tiles you choose we can help you plan out the quantities you need, the cuts and anything else you need for a job you’ll love for many years to come.